Tuesday, September 9, 2008

Did You Know?

- Many ancient-Greek writings, including the work of Aristotle, were introduced to Europe during the late Middle Ages by Islamic scholars.

- The Arab astronomer Al-Khwarizmi wrote several scientific books in the ninth century. Latin scholars later translated his work in the 13th century--introducing Europeans to the word "Algebra" and the place-value decimal system still in use today.

- The modern use of the Scientific Method was developed in early Muslim philosophy.

- Arab mathematician Ibn Al-Haitham advanced the science of optics in the 10th century, by solving particular problems related to the refraction of light.

- These familiar English words have their medieval origins in the language and scientific contributions of Islamic scholars: alkali, alchemy, alcohol, algorithm, almanac, zenith and zero.

- The upper-class of Europe practiced the art of Courtly Love during the later Middle Ages, which was influenced by Arabic poetry.

Courtesy: history.com


2 comments:

Bradley said...

I appreciate your comments about Ibn al-Haytham's contribution to the development of the scientific method. In my book Ibn al-Haytham: First Scientist, the first full biography of the eleventh century Muslim scholar known in the West as Alhazen, I point out that Ibn al-Haitham's development of the scientific method was the natural outgrowth of his faith. Like all good Muslims, Ibn al-Haytham believed that human beings are flawed and only God is perfect. To discover the truth about nature, he reasoned, one had to eliminate human opinion and error and allow God's creation to speak for itself. "The seeker after truth is not one who studies the writings of the ancients and, following his natural disposition, puts his trust in them," he wrote, "but rather the one who suspects his faith in them and questions what he gathers from them, the one who submits to argument and demonstration."

Bradley said...

I appreciate your comments about Ibn al-Haytham's contribution to the development of the scientific method. In my book Ibn al-Haytham: First Scientist, the first full biography of the eleventh century Muslim scholar known in the West as Alhazen, I point out that Ibn al-Haitham's development of the scientific method was the natural outgrowth of his faith. Like all good Muslims, Ibn al-Haytham believed that human beings are flawed and only God is perfect. To discover the truth about nature, he reasoned, one had to eliminate human opinion and error and allow God's creation to speak for itself. "The seeker after truth is not one who studies the writings of the ancients and, following his natural disposition, puts his trust in them," he wrote, "but rather the one who suspects his faith in them and questions what he gathers from them, the one who submits to argument and demonstration."